Sunday, February 7, 2016

Social Systems for the Cyberspace; organic development of systems


Big Bang Fireworks (9431612485).jpg
Attribution : commons.wikimedia.org


Starting from the networking needs of the military sixty decades back, the Cyberspace was evolving and self-developing in an organic way. The history of computer networking starts with the development of electronic computers in the 1950s. Initial concepts of networking was called packet networking and it originated in several computer science laboratories in the United States, Great Britain, and France. These efforts got greater purpose when the US Department of Defence awarded contracts for packet network systems, including the development of the ARPANET (which would become the first network to use the Internet Protocol.) during 1960s. 


When the first message was sent over the ARPANET from Professor Leonard Kleinrock's laboratory at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) to the second network node at Stanford Research Institute (SRI), nobody might have realized that it was the Big Bang and the Cyberspace was created!


Right from the moment of origin, developments in the Cyberspace have been occurring quite organically in the same way the social systems have been developing in the real world for millions of years based on felt-needs. Yes, interestingly it has close proximity with the 'Organic theory of the state'. In the organic theory of the state, the union of individuals forming the State has been described as similar to the union between the several parts of an animal body, wherein all parts are functionally related and none can exist in isolation from the rest. Can something or somebody in the cyberspace exist in isolation? If a very loud 'NO' echoes as answer in the minds of majority, we have to admit that social systems in the Cyberspace is also organic. Every element of the Cyberspace ecosystem has been evolving in an interconnected and interdependent way; from the access to it to whatever thing you can list out there. 


Everybody has a space in the cyberspace. Of course, access to that space is a problem for many now. But the possible developments in the cyberspace in the coming decades, would definitely make the access universal. Nobody can stop it; nobody can deny it – it will be the evolving universal rule. But it will further necessitate stable social systems in the cyberspace. Therefore every individual in this world has to contribute towards maintaining a better Cyberspace.


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